From Things to Services: The rise of service design and social innovation in Asia Pacific

This landmark event brings together key change-makers in Singapore and Asia-Pacific region who are shaping the landscape in service design and social innovation for positive impact. Over the two days, this event will inspire ideas, stimulate discussion, provoke thinking and collaboratively explore what it means to design in this landscape. All design students, academics and those interested in design from business and 3rd sector organisations are welcome.

For more information, please download the poster or go to DESIAP website.

It’s Tight Shorts the Christmas Edition! Yes, can you believe it’s that time of year already? Tight Shorts is a new offering from the Service Design Melbourne Network. Each event we will be showcasing a number of short and sweet talks on a different service design related theme – followed by networking and drinks.

Venue: Horse Bazaar. Happy hour all night on Monday so $6 pints, wine, etc!

Time: December 1, 2014, from 6.30-8.30pm
CLICK HERE to sign up via Eventbrite
In Tight Shorts #2 (Christmas Edition): Giving Back – Service Design in the Not For Profit Sector, we will be hearing from three practitioners about their experiences using human centred design to enable social/humanitarian organisaations in being more effective in their work and achieving their aims.
We will be hearing three fascinating stories of work with Diabetes Australia, InfoExchange and agencies working areas relevant to disaster risk.
Speakers
Charles-Henri Lison
Charles is a Senior Experience Designer at Sympicit. Charles will be sharing his experience of working as an internal designer with a not for profit during his time at InfoExchange: The mindset it requries, the challenges the sector faces with funding, some of the cultural clashes with the tech and government worlds and more.

Ani Patke
Ani is a Manager at the Customer Experience Company. He will be introducing us to a project he undertook with Diabetes Australia’s (DA) and their clothing donation program. Hear about how a human centred approach helped Ani get to the heart of a problem and enable DA in understanding its people in order to deliver this great program.

Yoko Akama
Yoko is a design researcher and educator at RMIT University, and the co-founder and leader of Service Design Network Melbourne. In this talk, she’ll share the approaches taken with communities and emergency management agencies to understand and strengthen resilience in mitigating disaster risks. This led to receiving the Best in Category for Service Design in the 2014 Good Design Award. She is passionate about what people can do together to tackle complex problems, and how co-designing can scaffold engagement, co-creation and transformation.

CLICK HERE to sign up via Eventbrite
Service Design Melbourne is a free member network. To sign up visit www.servicedesign.net.au

A big shout out to Horse Bazarr for providing our venue for the evening. Go and check them out at  www.horsebazaar.com.au

Theme:

Be warned, this is not a regular design talk.

A curated list of industry professionals will lead discussions in small groups about the connection between design and social responsibility.You are encouraged to ask difficult questions.

Come ready to discuss ideas, argue your perspective, drink beer and be inspired. Walk away knowing what kind of designer you want to be.

P.S. There will be food trucks.

Organised by Thick and Oxfam Australia’s Design for Change.

Thick is a strategic design consultancy with a focus on health, education and public services. We believe in the power of business to transform the planet for good. We design and create products and experiences that improve the lives of people as well as build social, environmental and business benefit.

Oxfam Australia’s Design for Change is a unique university program run by Oxfam Australia supporting design and communications students, the creative industries and emerging professionals to use their skills, creativity and problem solving capacity for global good. Every year Design for change works with leading universities in Sydney and Melbourne to foster socially engaged design thinking and practices into the next wave of designers.

designforchange.org.au

Theme:

Partners:
Oxfam Australia, Studio Thick

Dawn O’Neill AM: Collective Impact and Social Change – a challenge and an opportunity for the Service Design community.
Collective Impact is a philosophy, a framework, an approach that is being applied to address many complex social problems in the US, UK, and now in Australia. The event, in conjunction with RSA A+NZ, will show how Collective Impact can facilitate long lasting social change by bringing cross-sector organisations together to focus on a common agenda. Dawn O’Neill AM will highlight where Service Design can play an intrinsic role in dealing with the wicked problems that beset all these initiatives and how design can contribute to facilitating improvements and better outcomes for the organisations and the people and communities they serve.

Dawn O’Neill, previously the CEO of beyondblue and Lifeline Australia, was appointed a Member of the Order of Australia for services to the community and to Mental Health in 2009. Dawn currently provides business coaching and consulting to social sector leaders in collaborative and participatory change with a particular focus on Collective Impact. She is also the Chair of STREAT, an innovative homelessness social enterprise, a Director of Ten20 a newly formed venture philanthropy organisation sup-porting community based, collective impact initiatives and a Director of Big White Wall an innovative on line mental health and wellbeing service.

You can download the presentation here.

Theme:

Partners:
Collective Impact, RSA, Service Design Network Melbourne, RMIT University

“The Australian Public Service (APS) is increasingly being tasked with solving very complex policy problems. Some of these policy issues are so complex they have been called ‘wicked’ problems. The term ‘wicked’ in this context is used, not in the sense of evil, but rather as an issue highly resistant to resolution.

Successfully solving or at least managing these wicked policy problems requires a reassessment of some of the traditional ways of working and solving problems in the APS. They challenge our governance structures, our skills base and our organisational capacity.

It is important, as a first step, that wicked problems be recognised as such. Successfully tackling wicked problems requires a broad recognition and understanding, including from governments and Ministers, that there are no quick fixes and simple solutions.

Tackling wicked problems is an evolving art. They require thinking that is capable of grasping the big picture, including the interrelationships among the full range of causal factors underlying them. They often require broader, more collaborative and innovative approaches. This may result in the occasional failure or need for policy change or adjustment.

Wicked problems highlight the fundamental importance of the APS building on the progress that has been made with working across organisational boundaries both within and outside the APS. The APS needs to continue to focus on effectively engaging stakeholders and citizens in understanding the relevant issues and in involving them in identifying possible solutions.

The purpose of this publication is more to stimulate debate around what is needed for the successful tackling of wicked problems than to provide all the answers. Such a debate is a necessary precursor to reassessing our current systems, frameworks and ways of working to ensure they are capable of responding to the complex issues facing the APS.”

(Australian Public Service Commission 2007, p. iii)

 

File: wicked problems 2007

Sarah used Myki’s (Melbourne public transport system) complex problem as a context to introduce some of Snook’s service design processes to the participants.

Bio:
Sarah focuses on making social change happen by re-thinking public services from a human perspective. With a Masters of Design Innovation from Glasgow School of Art, Sarah is a social entrepreneur, unashamedly proving the value of design in central government and defining a meaningful role for designers in the public sector. Her work challenges the role design can play within the public sector, and as the winner of the first Scottish Social Innovation Camp, Sarah is ambitiously challenging the way governments operate and make policies through initiatives such as MyPolice.

As a fellow of Google, Sarah has a flair for using technology as an enabler and thrives leading processes of change, putting design at the heart of organisations and complex systems.

Prior to being the Director of Snook, Sarah won £20,000 for a community in Glasgow by giving local people the tools and confidence to build their own social enterprise. She also spent a year working inside Skills Development Scotland alongside their Service Design and Innovation Directorate to embed the design process in their organisation.

Sarah’s service design expertise and public sector innovation knowledge has recently taken her to keynote in Taiwan, Australia and America.

 

Sarah Drummond is the Co-founder and Director of Service Design Social Innovation outfit Snook, based in Scotland, UK. Her talk focused on public realm service design and Snook’s approach to designing new futures with citizens and governments. For example, Do-tanks for governments can use design thinking techniques and service design process as a way to innovate public services and turn policy into action in their own countries. Snook see service design as a powerful tool to solve complex social issues and designing new futures.

Sarah covered what service design is from Snook’s perspective, highlighting core principles of how they work. Various project examples demonstrated how they design inside the system (eg. Redesigning the Post 16 Learner Journey with Scottish Government) and from outside the system (eg. The Matter). Ideas such as Jams and Idea Labs are way to solve problems and collaborate across sectors. Sarah will discuss the mindset shifts needed to move towards a design-led approach to social innovation.

 

Bio:
Sarah Drummond is the Co-founder and Director of Service Design Social Innovation outfit Snook. Sarah focuses on making social change happen by re-thinking public services from a human perspective. With a Masters of Design Innovation from Glasgow School of Art, Sarah is a social entrepreneur, unashamedly proving the value of design in central government and defining a meaningful role for designers in the public sector. Her work challenges the role design can play within the public sector, and as the winner of the first Scottish Social Innovation Camp, Sarah is ambitiously challenging the way governments operate and make policies through initiatives such as MyPolice.

As a fellow of Google, Sarah has a flair for using technology as an enabler and thrives leading processes of change, putting design at the heart of organisations and complex systems.

Prior to being the Director of Snook, Sarah won £20,000 for a community in Glasgow by giving local people the tools and confidence to build their own social enterprise. She also spent a year working inside Skills Development Scotland alongside their Service Design and Innovation Directorate to embed the design process in their organisation.

Sarah’s service design expertise and public sector innovation knowledge has recently taken her to keynote in Taiwan, Australia and America.

Community
Subscribe
The Australian Centre for Social Innovation (TACSI)
Contact
Jump to top