Energy & Digital Living

Energy and Digital Living is based on the sensory and digital ethnography methodologies and design research at Loughborough University, UK, as part of the EPSRC funded LEEDR project.

Energy and Digital Living website aims to disseminate both the ethnographic findings and design interventions developed from the work, as well as the digital-sensory ethnography methodology that was developed as a way of researching energy and digital media in the home. There are a number of articles published that take the ideas developed on the web site into more theoretical depth. These are linked to the site.

The site is intended to be used by scholars and practitioners from different disciplines who are interested in this field, researchers and designers interested in video methods and digital-sensory ethnography practice and in interdisciplinary work, and has the potential to be used for teaching around a number of areas.

Theme:

Dawn O’Neill AM: Collective Impact and Social Change – a challenge and an opportunity for the Service Design community.
Collective Impact is a philosophy, a framework, an approach that is being applied to address many complex social problems in the US, UK, and now in Australia. The event, in conjunction with RSA A+NZ, will show how Collective Impact can facilitate long lasting social change by bringing cross-sector organisations together to focus on a common agenda. Dawn O’Neill AM will highlight where Service Design can play an intrinsic role in dealing with the wicked problems that beset all these initiatives and how design can contribute to facilitating improvements and better outcomes for the organisations and the people and communities they serve.

Dawn O’Neill, previously the CEO of beyondblue and Lifeline Australia, was appointed a Member of the Order of Australia for services to the community and to Mental Health in 2009. Dawn currently provides business coaching and consulting to social sector leaders in collaborative and participatory change with a particular focus on Collective Impact. She is also the Chair of STREAT, an innovative homelessness social enterprise, a Director of Ten20 a newly formed venture philanthropy organisation sup-porting community based, collective impact initiatives and a Director of Big White Wall an innovative on line mental health and wellbeing service.

You can download the presentation here.

Theme:

Partners:
Collective Impact, RSA, Service Design Network Melbourne, RMIT University
GovCamp is about more than events – it’s an invitation is to be part of an ongoing conversation to inspire and shape new opportunities for public innovation.

It is an opportunity to talk with a mix of people – from inside and outside government, from the worlds of technology and policy, of community and universities – to talk about shaping an agenda for innovation and to make a start on that agenda.

This is a call to people who want to come a be part of a conversation about innovation in government.

GovCamp is for people like you
Public sector practitioners, advisers and leaders who are excited by these challenges, who seek to better understand the risks and opportunities within emerging trends.

There are no clever corporate games; just dialogue and an open exchange of ideas.  It’s a Saturday. It’s free time, casual and as “off-the-record” as you need.  And because it’s shared conversation, you’ll take away even more than you contribute.
Courtesy of our generous organising partners, registration and catering is FREE.

Theme:

Partners:
EPA Victoria, Futuregov
Project status: Ongoing
Partners: Municipal Association of Victoria, Design Managers Australia

The Municipal Association of Victoria (MAV) is a primary professional body representing a total of 79 local councils, which provides essential community services to a population over five and a half million people in Victoria. As a major representative of government sector service providers, MAV is confronting a range of urgent social policy and service delivery issues. For instance, community safety is a priority area that includes critical services for vulnerable and marginalised groups, such as preventing violence against women and protecting vulnerable youth. The social and economic implications that arise from these priority areas continue to challenge councils, with local governments burdened with significant costs and reducing their ability to affect meaningful change (MAV 2013). This project aims to explore one facet of the complex challenges faced by MAV and its capacity to deliver effective healthcare services to communities in Victoria. It intends to understand these complex environments that are in flux and examines how to design a human-centred service delivery process that is agile and effective for the communities they serve. It is important to understand the current and future make-up of communities who receive services. Such an understanding can help to shape how services are delivered, how to address the needs of the community and plan for change in the long term. The project aims to directly contribute to this understanding by designing a process that will enable a more efficient and effective delivery service to engender a culture of responsive governance.

Design for social innovation is carving out new frontiers of knowledge in service delivery. It is an approach that invites people to be active participants in the design process. As such, MAV staff and selected community members will be involved in service design workshops. As a major industry partner on this project, Design Managers Australia (DMA) will play a key role in assisting this design process, bringing their professional design expertise in public sector policy. DMA and MAV have a strong association and history, having worked closely together to deliver effective outcomes in the area of maternity and child healthcare policy. This unique blend of expertise provides an opportunity to build on this relationship and broadens its scope in the ongoing work to strengthen the provision of essential services to Victoria’s most vulnerable communities.

“The Australian Public Service (APS) is increasingly being tasked with solving very complex policy problems. Some of these policy issues are so complex they have been called ‘wicked’ problems. The term ‘wicked’ in this context is used, not in the sense of evil, but rather as an issue highly resistant to resolution.

Successfully solving or at least managing these wicked policy problems requires a reassessment of some of the traditional ways of working and solving problems in the APS. They challenge our governance structures, our skills base and our organisational capacity.

It is important, as a first step, that wicked problems be recognised as such. Successfully tackling wicked problems requires a broad recognition and understanding, including from governments and Ministers, that there are no quick fixes and simple solutions.

Tackling wicked problems is an evolving art. They require thinking that is capable of grasping the big picture, including the interrelationships among the full range of causal factors underlying them. They often require broader, more collaborative and innovative approaches. This may result in the occasional failure or need for policy change or adjustment.

Wicked problems highlight the fundamental importance of the APS building on the progress that has been made with working across organisational boundaries both within and outside the APS. The APS needs to continue to focus on effectively engaging stakeholders and citizens in understanding the relevant issues and in involving them in identifying possible solutions.

The purpose of this publication is more to stimulate debate around what is needed for the successful tackling of wicked problems than to provide all the answers. Such a debate is a necessary precursor to reassessing our current systems, frameworks and ways of working to ensure they are capable of responding to the complex issues facing the APS.”

(Australian Public Service Commission 2007, p. iii)

 

File: wicked problems 2007


We had the immense pleasure in hosting Stefan’s talk on service design.
Stefan Holmlid is associate professor at the Human-Centered Systems and is heading the Interaction and Service design research group. His current research projects make a deep dive into the realms of services, especially concerning the expressive powers of design methods and techniques in service development and service innovation, such as co-creative practices in service prototyping. The idea that design objects and design materials can be both dynamic, active and that the design is co-created “in use”, drive his research of relevant theoretical grounding for design, inspire his design research on materials, and challenges the way we understand how to prototype design objects for user involvement. He is a co-founder of the the international Service Design and Service Innovation conference, ServDes, the Service Design in Tourism conference, and the International Service Design Network.

Associate Professor Stefan Holmlid (Linköping University) & Dr Gavin Melles (Swinburne University) gratefully acknowledge their joint STINT (Swedish Foundation for International Cooperation in Research and Higher Education) Initiation Grant (IB2012 4052) in Service Design and Design Education for funding A/P Holmlid’s visit to Melbourne.

Organized By: Swinburne University and Design Research Institute, RMIT University

Download the podcast here (right-click and ‘save as’)

Sarah used Myki’s (Melbourne public transport system) complex problem as a context to introduce some of Snook’s service design processes to the participants.

Bio:
Sarah focuses on making social change happen by re-thinking public services from a human perspective. With a Masters of Design Innovation from Glasgow School of Art, Sarah is a social entrepreneur, unashamedly proving the value of design in central government and defining a meaningful role for designers in the public sector. Her work challenges the role design can play within the public sector, and as the winner of the first Scottish Social Innovation Camp, Sarah is ambitiously challenging the way governments operate and make policies through initiatives such as MyPolice.

As a fellow of Google, Sarah has a flair for using technology as an enabler and thrives leading processes of change, putting design at the heart of organisations and complex systems.

Prior to being the Director of Snook, Sarah won £20,000 for a community in Glasgow by giving local people the tools and confidence to build their own social enterprise. She also spent a year working inside Skills Development Scotland alongside their Service Design and Innovation Directorate to embed the design process in their organisation.

Sarah’s service design expertise and public sector innovation knowledge has recently taken her to keynote in Taiwan, Australia and America.

 

Sarah Drummond is the Co-founder and Director of Service Design Social Innovation outfit Snook, based in Scotland, UK. Her talk focused on public realm service design and Snook’s approach to designing new futures with citizens and governments. For example, Do-tanks for governments can use design thinking techniques and service design process as a way to innovate public services and turn policy into action in their own countries. Snook see service design as a powerful tool to solve complex social issues and designing new futures.

Sarah covered what service design is from Snook’s perspective, highlighting core principles of how they work. Various project examples demonstrated how they design inside the system (eg. Redesigning the Post 16 Learner Journey with Scottish Government) and from outside the system (eg. The Matter). Ideas such as Jams and Idea Labs are way to solve problems and collaborate across sectors. Sarah will discuss the mindset shifts needed to move towards a design-led approach to social innovation.

 

Bio:
Sarah Drummond is the Co-founder and Director of Service Design Social Innovation outfit Snook. Sarah focuses on making social change happen by re-thinking public services from a human perspective. With a Masters of Design Innovation from Glasgow School of Art, Sarah is a social entrepreneur, unashamedly proving the value of design in central government and defining a meaningful role for designers in the public sector. Her work challenges the role design can play within the public sector, and as the winner of the first Scottish Social Innovation Camp, Sarah is ambitiously challenging the way governments operate and make policies through initiatives such as MyPolice.

As a fellow of Google, Sarah has a flair for using technology as an enabler and thrives leading processes of change, putting design at the heart of organisations and complex systems.

Prior to being the Director of Snook, Sarah won £20,000 for a community in Glasgow by giving local people the tools and confidence to build their own social enterprise. She also spent a year working inside Skills Development Scotland alongside their Service Design and Innovation Directorate to embed the design process in their organisation.

Sarah’s service design expertise and public sector innovation knowledge has recently taken her to keynote in Taiwan, Australia and America.

DESIS-lab Melbourne hosted an evening of panel discussion to debate overlapping topics of design, ethics, public services and the agency of design in enabling social innovation.


Speakers were:
Dr Cameron Tonkinwise: Carnegie Mellon University
Mel Edwards and Justin Barrie: Design Managers Australia
Kate Archdeacon: Victorian Eco-Innovation Lab
David Hood: Doing: Something Good

As in the ABC 1 TV, ‘QandA’ panel discussion series, we asked attending participants to submit questions prior to the day. Below were those that were submitted, providing meaty food for thought.

 

  • In this era of social networking, it can be argued that society and community has become a market. For instance, social networking sites rely on users disclosing personal information that can be sold to advertisers. How can the ethical designer create online projects that are successful but don’t exploit users? One way is for designers to acknowledge in whose interests they work.
  • How do we design with people where differences and diversity can be productive, rather than be seen as an obstacle? How do we then demonstrate ‘equity’ and participation?
  • What in the education or experience of the designer supports designers to understand the ethics/responsibilites of working with diverse stakeholder groups on projects that seek to effect change?
  • It is possible that the zeal of designers to enter the social innovation space could see them imposing their wish for involvement on society where there is no specific interest from a community?
  • There is also the issue of social innovation projects that are more social entrepreneurship and where the project initiator seeks to simultaneously effect change and set up a business. What are the ethics of involving others as volunteers in such activities?
  • When trust for government is breaking down, what is the role of community-led organisations, social media network clusters – how are they practicing participation? Who does the designer advocate on behalf of, and how do they practice voicing and practicing through their designing?
  • What promises do we make as designers when we design in this space?
  • What kinds of designers does this area attract? What had motivated you and what keeps you going?
  • Practices which encourage Social Innovation and Sustainability offer different ways to think about designers and design agency – how do you see this effecting design education here in Australia?
  • In terms of the particular examples or tactics for social innovation and sustainability, is it important for these to actually be effective and/or sustainable or is it ‘the thought that counts’?
  • Herbert Simon famously wrote about design as a practice which enables ‘a move from the actual to the preferred’. Do you think that ideas for social innovation and sustainability have a similar understanding of design’s role, and if so, who’s ‘preferences’ do those ideas aim to meet?
  • One of DESIS’s main activities is to find existing ideas for ‘Social Innovation and Sustainable Practice’ and facilitate the uptake of those ideas more broadly and in other locations. Could this be interpreted as an attempt at developing social ‘pattern languages’? and does it come with a possible danger of outcomes and projects being applied out of context?

This event is being funded by the Design Research Institute, RMIT University

This video was filmed during DESIS-lab Melbourne symposium on 1st March 2012

Social Innovation for a less-stuff-heavy-world

I will present social innovation as the polar opposite of technical innovation – where the designer as agent aims to change the world by organising people into an activity ecosystem. Technical innovation focuses on behaviour change by inserting technological and/or material artefacts that enable, nay constrain, people to do things differently. The studio in social innovation may look at a social problem such as “alcohol fuelled violence in small town Australia” or at enabling cultural vehicles such as “guerilla retail” where designer-makers engage with their customers in high energy obscure and poky locations. Often these studios are set up to challenge and provoke students, who in turn are challenged to provoke and massage groups of people/ communities into sustainable enterprises that steer clear of the mainstream market economy. Run in collaboration with College of Business, the social innovation solution gets taken further forward from the scenarios on posters to action planning in the form of Business Plans. Collectively the focus of the Social Innovation Studio is on a world where this is less ‘stuff’ – and where needs and wants are met through social and communal – coops, communes, collectives, organisms and crucially, the construction of vehicles for individual activism.

The latest example of developing ‘activism’ is this student collective I have nurtured through 2011

The summer of social change and their facebook space

 

Theme:

Community
Subscribe
Tackling Wicked Problems: A public policy perspective
Contact
Jump to top