Projects

Zoo Poo and You Studio

Semester 2, 2016 (in progress)

Studio leads
Tania Ivanka
with Toni Roberts

Inspired by educator and systems thinker Linda Booth Sweeney:
“Education in how living systems function should be a fundamental part of 21st century schooling and anyone’s lifelong learning plan,”¹
the Zoo Poo and You studio aims to engage people in learning about and understanding the complexity of ecological systems and how they are entangled with and impacted by human activity.
The Melbourne Zoo is a significant living case study of zero waste to landfill practice. The Zoo waste management team regularly provides tours to local government and business groups. However this amazing story is largely unknown to everyday visitors of the zoo.

Using mapping and visualisation to make sense of the flows of materials and waste and the interaction of people, students have gained insight into the successes of a relatively enclosed system, including the onsite composting of organic materials, but also the challenges of a broader society operating under a different paradigm transgressing the ideals of the zoo practicing as a zero waste to landfill enterprise.
From these insights students are developing interpretive and playful artefacts to educate zoo visitors in the fascinating behind the scenes of the zoo.

¹ http://www.lindaboothsweeney.net/learning

From Week 02 Zoo Waste Management Site Visit “What Stood Out for You”

Food Cycle
I think it’s genius that the mulch and compost created is a closed loop. The compost goes to Weribee Zoo, the food is grown, the food is eaten, pooped out, and so on and so on. It’s a nice visual cue too for further designs.
– Nadia Raineri

Zero Waste Goal
I admire Melbourne Zoo’s goal to produce zero waste by 2019. It have definitely challenge my perspective on what waste is to me, and the effort we can make individually on recycling.
– Ding Hou Edwin Ang (Edwin Ang)

Passionate
The guys working with the composting process were extremely passionate with what they do. It takes a certain kind of person to do what they do for the environment. You can see their intentions genuine and that they really care.
– Erin – Wen Zhen Tan

Bins
What stood out for me was people putting things in the wrong bins. I thought a lot about how much time and energy is used trying to sort the waste when there are specific bins designed for people to put things in. I wonder a lot about why the message just isn’t getting across and why people don’t take the time to stop and think for a moment about what they are doing. I wonder if people would take the time if it somehow impacted them directly. Something to perhaps think about for the coming weeks.
– Nadia Raineri

Microbial Systems within HotRot
What we didn’t get to see is (well of course we can’t) the microbial processes that’s happening within the HotRot. I’m wondering if there’s any documentation on this process at the Zoo. Perhaps what’s fascinating is the mutual symbiotic relationship between keepers and animals is quite synonymous with the guys and the microbes. The circle of life analogy comes into play.
– Erin – Wen Zhen Tan

Different kind of waste are recycled
Almost all the waste is recycled at the zoo… Plastic, concrete, steel, organic [materials]. They want to achieve the zero waste policy before the 2019…
– Hans Christian Jacobsen

The endless possibilities with the end-product
All the things you can make with the ZooGro, and the cycle of life of the product, inside and outside the zoo…
– Hans Christian Jacobsen

 

Nadia Raineri

Nadia Raineri

Manuely Avila

Manuely Avila

Jennifer Mai

Jennifer Mai

Erin Wen Zhen Tan and Kristen Carless

Erin Wen Zhen Tan and Kristen Carless

Erin Wen Zhen Tan and Kristen Carless

Erin Wen Zhen Tan and Kristen Carless

 


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